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W. Kirk Snyder. SETL2 man page.

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W. Kirk Snyder. SETL2 man page.

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SETL2(Local)            Setl2 Version 2.2            SETL2(Local)



NAME
     stll - library utility program
     stlc - SETL2 compiler
     stlx - SETL2 executor

DESCRIPTIONS
     There are three general steps to be performed before you can
     use SETL2:

         Your PATH environment string must include the  directory
         where    SETL2's    executable   files   are   installed
         (/usr/local/bin on this system).

         You need to create an empty SETL2 library  to  hold  the
         SETL2 objects you'll make.

         You need to create an  environment  string  pointing  to
         this library.


  USING THE LIBRARY UTILITY
     One of the command files distributed with SETL2 is  stll,  a
     library  utility program.  Eventually, this should perform a
     variety of functions, but at the moment it is only  used  to
     create empty libraries.  To do that, change to any directory
     where you keep data files and enter the following command:

         stll -c ``library name''

     A normal ``library name'' is setl2.lib.

     Finally, you should set the environment string SETL2_LIB  to
     tell SETL2 where your default library is.  The command to do
     this, setenv SETL2_LIB ~setl2.lib, is best  placed  in  your
     .login file.


  EXECUTING THE COMPILER
     The command to compile a SETL2 source program is:

         stlc <options> <file specifier> [<file specifier>

     You may use wild cards in specifying the files  to  be  com-
     piled.  The following options are recognized:

         -s            Produce a listing of the program with line
                       numbers  and  error  messages.  By default
                       errors will be printed on standard output.
                       If  this  option  is  given a listing file
                       with the extension .lis will be produced.

         -t n          Set tab width to n. This is  generally  an
                       unnecessary    option.    Error   messages
                       include both line and column numbers,  and
                       the  column  numbers  will be incorrect if
                       the source file uses tabs not set at eight
                       column  intervals.   If  an editor is used
                       which can move the cursor to the line  and
                       column  of  an  error,  it  will need that
                       information.  By setting this  option  any
                       tab  interval may be used.  If line number
                       information is sufficient (which  is  gen-
                       erally   the  case)  this  option  can  be
                       ignored.

         -i            Disable   implicit   declarations.    SETL
                       implicitly declared any names for which it
                       did  not  find  an  explicit  declaration.
                       SETL2  continued  this by default, but for
                       other than quick and dirty  programs  that
                       may not be desirable.  When this option is
                       set all variables must be declared.

                       We  do  make  implicit   declarations   by
                       default,  since  we  feel that the compile
                       commands for  larger  programs  will  gen-
                       erally be in make files, which do not have
                       to be changed  very  often.   The  compile
                       command  should  be  convenient  for short
                       programs, in which case implicit  declara-
                       tions  will  probably  be desired.  If you
                       disagree with this philosophy, you can set
                       the environment string to your own desired
                       defaults.

         -f            Toggle  use  of  intermediate  files.   By
                       default,  the compiler stores intermediate
                       forms of the program on  disk  for  MS-DOS
                       systems and in core on Unix systems.  This
                       option reverses that setting.  If you  are
                       using  an  operating  system  with virtual
                       memory, you will probably find  it  faster
                       to compile in core only.  If you are using
                       a PC, this is not  recommended,  since  at
                       present  the compiler does not make use of
                       extended or expanded memory and  there  is
                       not  much  extra memory in a PC.  The best
                       thing you can do with expanded or extended
                       memory  is  to use a RAM disk, and set the
                       environment option to  force  intermediate
                       files to be stored there.

         -l file name  Updated library name.  This string must be
                       a  valid  file  name on the system you are
                       using.  If there are embedded  spaces  you
                       must  use  quotes  to make the file name a
                       single string.

         -p file path  Library search path.  This is  a  list  of
                       semicolon-delimited  file specifiers which
                       describe a list of files  to  be  searched
                       for any imported packages.  Each specifier
                       may contain  wildcards  if  desired.   You
                       should  note that the compiler will search
                       only until it finds  a  package  with  the
                       name  given  in a use clause.  It will not
                       check for duplicates.  When wildcards  are
                       used,  the  order of search will depend on
                       the disk subsystem (system calls are  used
                       to expand the file specifiers).


  EXECUTING THE INTERPRETER
     After the program is successfully compiled it  may  be  exe-
     cuted with the command:

         stlx <options> <program name> [<argument> ...]

     CAUTION: When you execute a program, you give  the  name  of
     the  program,  not  the name of the file which contained it.
     For example: if the following program:


         program this_is_a_junk_program;
         var some_trash;
         ...
         end this_is_a_junk_program;

     is in the file junk.stl, then you would compile that program
     with the command

         stlc junk

     but you would execute the program with the command

         stlx this_is_a_junk_program

     The arguments after the program name will be gathered into a
     tuple,  and  will  be  available  to  the SETL2 program as "
     command_line".

     The options available are:


         -a mode       This sets the assert mode.  There are  two
                       possible  values  for  mode:  f is used if
                       failing assertions should stop the program
                       but   succeeding   assertions   should  be
                       skipped,  and  l  is  used  if  succeeding
                       assertions should be logged.


         -l file name  Updated library name.  The library is  not
                       actually  updated,  this  is  provided for
                       consistency  with  the   compiler.    This
                       library  will  be searched before those in
                       the search path.


         -p file path  Library search path.  This is  a  list  of
                       semicolon  delimited file specifiers which
                       describe a list of files  to  be  searched
                       for any imported packages.  Each specifier
                       may contain  wildcards  if  desired.   You
                       should  note that the compiler will search
                       only until it finds  a  package  with  the
                       name  given  in a use clause.  It will not
                       check for duplicates.  When wildcards  are
                       used,  the  order of search will depend on
                       the disk subsystem (system calls are  used
                       to expand the file specifiers).

ENVIRONMENT STRINGS
     The following is a list of useful environment strings recog-
     nized by the SETL2 compiler and interpreter.

         SETL2_LIB         This lets you place the name  of  your
                           update  library  in  the  environment,
                           rather than specifying it on the  com-
                           mand  line.  You should probably place
                           a command in your .login script to set
                           this for you when you log on.

         SETL2_LIBPATH     This is a list of libraries which will
                           be  searched  for  imported  packages.
                           The default is empty, which will prob-
                           ably  be  OK  generally.  It is just a
                           string of comma-delimited file specif-
                           iers, which may include wildcards.

         SETL2_TMP         This  string  is  a  prefix  used   to
                           specify  where  temporary files should
                           be stored.  It is primarily useful  on
                           a  PC,  where  you  should use this to
                           hold the letter of your RAM  disk,  if
                           you  have  one.   For example, if your
                           RAM disk is logical drive d, you would
                           place  in  your  autoexec.bat file the
                           command set SETL2_TMP d:.

         STLC_OPTIONS      This is a string of options which will
                           be  read  in front of the command line
                           by the compiler.  You can use this  to
                           change   the   default   for  implicit
                           declarations, tab width,  or  anything
                           else.

         STLX_OPTIONS      This is a used just like the  previous
                           string,  but  is  used  by  the inter-
                           preter.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
     Many of the changes made in SETL2 were motivated by comments
     and  ideas  voiced  in the SETL meetings at New York Univer-
     sity.  I would like to thank all who attended those meetings
     and  participated  in  the discussions, in particular Robert
     Dewar, Fritz Henglein, Bob Paige, Ed Schonberg, and  Matthew
     Smosna.

     I would also like to thank Jack Schwartz, who  offered  many
     helpful  comments  and  suggestions, and gave the system its
     most thorough test.
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